au gratin

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ChrisGreaves
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au gratin

Post by ChrisGreaves »

I might have overplayed my "I've been ill" card, because Kerry has increased meal delivery. Twice this month I have had Cod au Gratin delivered by David. (He is a bit ticked off because MY supper is neatly laid out, with a bread roll, on a plate, while David has to serve his meal from the pot, Kerry being at work.)

Until last week I thought Cod au gratin had to be a French dish, served in places I couldn't afford to go, even in France. On top of that I thought that "au gratin" meant "grated cheese", (gratin=grated, right? :blush: )
I have since looked up a few recipes.

Au Gratin seems to be whatever food you plan to make, with a cheese sauce poured over it, the lot topped with breadcrumbs, and the casserole baked in an oven.
This recipe for cod au gratin is titled "A Newfoundland Favourite" and it comes from Rock Recipes, "rock" as in "The Rock". (Which, of course, sends me off trying to anagramize "au gratin" with "granite")

So now, of course, I shall embark on a few weeks of cooking everything au gratin, a great excuse to buy cheese and eat up everything in sight: potatoes, fish, red meat, artichokes, cabbage, ...

And since I experiment with bread recipes I have a near-endless supply of bread crumbs(grin)
Cheers, Chris
I’ve been tidying the junk out of my shed for five years, and now can hardly get into the shed

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HansV
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Re: au gratin

Post by HansV »

Not sure your cardiologist will be grate-ful. :sad:
Best wishes,
Hans

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ChrisGreaves
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Re: au gratin

Post by ChrisGreaves »

HansV wrote:
26 May 2024, 19:23
Not sure your cardiologist will be grate-ful. :sad:
"cardiologist "? :evilgrin:
Not sure what he/she/it has to complain about.
"potatoes, fish, red meat, artichokes, cabbage" and the red meat probably extra-lean moose; mostly vegetables there, if you ask me. And this year the artichokes AND the potatoes home-grown without pesticide.
(signed) "1,935 consecutive nights sleeping in Bonavista".
P.S. I know, I know: you're wondering how I will celebrate 2,000 consecutive nights asleep in Bonavista, right? I have invited David and Kerry to dine with me at PK's Fish and Chip shop. I'm sure that they don't have cod au gratin on the menu. C
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Re: au gratin

Post by GeoffW »

HansV wrote:
26 May 2024, 19:23
Not sure your cardiologist will be grate-ful. :sad:
Codiologist surely?

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John Gray
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Re: au gratin

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Sounds to me like a load of codswallop...! :laugh:
John Gray

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That amounted to nothing.​​

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ChrisGreaves
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Re: au gratin

Post by ChrisGreaves »

John Gray wrote:
27 May 2024, 10:37
Sounds to me like a load of codswallop...! :laugh:
codswallow, John, codswallow :munch:
Cheers, Chris
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ChrisGreaves
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Re: au gratin

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ChrisGreaves wrote:
26 May 2024, 19:14
Until last week I thought Cod au gratin had to be a French dish,
In the interest of squeezing value out of every penny, I continue to experiment. My most recent version used reconstituted skim milk powder instead of accident-prone cardboard cartons of whole milk.
My obervations to date are:-
(1) Cod au gratin is just another excuse for pigging-out on significant amounts of several tasty cheeses
(2) If you buy enough varieties of cheese, you don't have to use them fully, which leaves several slabs to be consumed au main "before they dry out"
(3) Cod au gratin can suffer from too much salt; in which case it can be spread out, lasting a week, as a form of cheese sauce with pasta.
(4) I can get certain dishes washed in a dishwasher by filling them with Cod au gratin and asking David and Kerry to tell me what they think.
Cheers, Chris :sneaky: :yep:
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John Gray
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Re: au gratin

Post by John Gray »

Returning to this thread (with a weary sigh, I must admit) and looking at the menu, I am left with some conclusions, observations and questions:
1) you should hope that the Soup of the Day is French Onion Soup (whether au gratin or au not)
2) the concept of a "½ Hot Sandwich" makes me wonder whether the half-hotness is measured in °C or °F (surely not °K). (Wouldn't describing them as "lukewarm" have been more informative?)
3) what in heaven's name is a "Western" (presumably sandwich)? An historic[al] sandwich, perhaps?
4) intriguing to note the complete absence of anything egg-based or egg-related (apart, of course, from the chicken (pressure-fried(?))

One may learn a lot about the culinary tastes and sophistication of a population from a perusal of local restaurant menus... :rofl:
John Gray

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That amounted to nothing.​​

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ChrisGreaves
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Re: au gratin

Post by ChrisGreaves »

John Gray wrote:
29 Jun 2024, 14:27
One may learn a lot about the culinary tastes and sophistication of a population from a perusal of local restaurant menus... :rofl:
You can learn even more, without needing to tip the wait staff, by pacing out the aisles in the supermarket and noting the ratio of
(1) Shelf-feet to
(2) Shelf feet devoted to Colas and Crisps (N.Amer "Crisps"?)

My limited experience tells me that supermarkets will not stock stuff that folks won't buy. As an example, when did you last spot fresh Dandelion Leaves in a supermarket? :yum:
Cheers, Chris
I’ve been tidying the junk out of my shed for five years, and now can hardly get into the shed