Messier 100

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StuartR
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Re: Messier 100

Post by StuartR »

stuck wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 11:37
:scratch: I'm clearly missing something here...

Ken
I think plus crasseux translates as messier
StuartR


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HansV
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Re: Messier 100

Post by HansV »

Spoiler
Crasseux is a French word for messy. Plus Crasseux = messier :evilgrin:
Regards,
Hans

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HansV
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Re: Messier 100

Post by HansV »

StuartR wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 11:57
I think plus crasseux translates as messier
Exactly! :thumbup:
Regards,
Hans

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StuartR
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Re: Messier 100

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One thing that I love about this lounge is the ability to share multi-lingual puns with a reasonable expectation that people will get them
StuartR


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stuck
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Re: Messier 100

Post by stuck »

Ah, OK, I'm with you now.

Ken

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Graeme
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Re: Messier 100

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HansV wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 11:03
I bet his first name was Plus...

:laugh:

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Re: Messier 100

Post by GeoffW »

StuartR wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 12:16
One thing that I love about this lounge is the ability to share multi-lingual puns with a reasonable expectation that people will get them
Some people get them :sad:

When the pun is about a galaxy, it's waaaay over my head .

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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Messier 100

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Graeme wrote:
18 Apr 2021, 10:34
My first 3 hour exposure image and had to do my first meridian flip as the object moved past due south during the exposures!
Graeme, I have patiently waited over a month in the faint hopes that someone else would ask, saving me the exposure of my ignorance, but ...
... Please and Thank You, what is a meridian Flip, and Why, and How, and When.
Take your time ....
Cheers
Chris
I have been in a state of countesslessness all my life

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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Messier 100

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GeoffW wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 20:29
When the pun is about a galaxy, it's waaaay over my head .
"whey", surely? And anywhey, it's no use crying under spilt milk. :flee: :flee: :flee:
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Chris
I have been in a state of countesslessness all my life

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Re: Messier 100

Post by GeoffW »

ChrisGreaves wrote:
25 May 2021, 19:09
GeoffW wrote:
22 Apr 2021, 20:29
When the pun is about a galaxy, it's waaaay over my head .
"whey", surely? And anywhey, it's no use crying under spilt milk. :flee: :flee: :flee:
Cheers
Chris
That depends on which galaxy.

That's only if if it's the Milky Whey.

Graeme is giving us brilliant photos of other lactose free galaxies.

The Milky Whey, however, is "la creme de la creme".

Of course, people in space can't use milk. As they say in space, "Here, use cream".

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Graeme
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Re: Messier 100

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ChrisGreaves wrote:
25 May 2021, 19:08
...what is a meridian Flip, and Why, and How, and When.

The Equatorial mount on which my telescope moves has two axis. One points at the North celestial pole, which is about 45 arc minutes from Polaris and is parallel to the Earth's axis. This movement is called Right Ascension and is measured in hours, minutes and seconds. The other axis is Declination, is at 90° to the RA, is measured in degrees, minutes and seconds from the celestial equator, which is the Earth's equator projected into space. Dec increases to 90° at Polaris and to -90° at whatever is at the South celestial pole (not sure! (Southern cross I think! (never been there! (would love to though)))) These coordinates are fixed (more or less). So Vega, for instance, has the coordinates RA 18h 36m 56s Dec 38° 47' 08". At about 22:00 it sits in the East at an altitude of about 40° and moves West through the night as the Earth rotates. I can point my telescope at it and the motor controlling the RA axis will keep Vega in my field of view all night. At 03:19 in the morning Vega passes through the meridian which is a line due North to due South passing directly overhead. By now the telescope is pointing up at Vega, which has risen to an altitude of 78°, it can't go any further, the camera/eyepiece is in danger of hitting the tripod. So the telescope and the counterweighs swap round on the RA axis and the telescope does a 180° flip on the Dec axis so it ends up pointing in the same direction. The mount can now continue to track Vega until it sets in the West.

HTH!

Regards

Graeme

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Graeme
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Re: Messier 100

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