Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 15576
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: brings.slot.perky

Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by ChrisGreaves »

More classic "Stroud" Episode 122: The Name of the Game at the 52m17s mark

"In fact, this statute – which required the use of English – was itself composed in French. So here we have a bunch of English-speaking Parliamentarians who sometimes spoke French in Parliament, enacting a law in French, which required English to be spoken in the courts, but also required that the proceedings be written down and preserved in Latin. And that pretty much sums up the linguistic situation in England in the mid-1300s."
Cheers
Chris
Last edited by ChrisGreaves on 02 May 2021, 12:49, edited 1 time in total.
There's nothing heavier than an empty water bottle

GeoffW
PlatinumLounger
Posts: 4046
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 07:23

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by GeoffW »

Interesting.

I suspect you found it looking for another story on the same page, about the history of a word commonly (or not) regarded as obscene ;-)

User avatar
Argus
GoldLounger
Posts: 3081
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 19:07

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by Argus »

That it is the same in Swedish comes as no surprise. That said, we don't eat pirrodge nor porridge1, 2 for breakfast, or any time.


1 But we have sneakers, sale, food courts, people frequently go to resorts, airports; pubs tell us they have interesting food (as someone said, describing food as "interesting" has slightly negative connotations in English :laugh: ), etc. &c &c.

                                                                                                                                                    Pottage (+ some Vulgar Latin).
                                                                                                                                                    |
2 We eat gröt, sometimes, for breakfast. Gröt (SWE) - grautr (old Norse) - grut (old English) - groats -> porridge. :laugh:
Byelingual    When you speak two languages but start losing vocabulary in both of them.

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 78370
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by HansV »

I see what you did there, Chris! :grin:
Best wishes,
Hans

User avatar
Argus
GoldLounger
Posts: 3081
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 19:07

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by Argus »

HansV wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 09:42
I see what you did there, Chris! :grin:
I didn't, until you told me.

So do I :cheers:
Byelingual    When you speak two languages but start losing vocabulary in both of them.

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 15576
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: brings.slot.perky

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by ChrisGreaves »

GeoffW wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 02:40
I suspect you found it looking for another story on the same page, about the history of a word commonly (or not) regarded as obscene ;-)
:rofl: :laugh: :rofl: :laugh:
Hi Geoff. I see your point, but had not spotted that until an eviler mind than mine pointed it out.
Truth is I treat myself to one bit of "froth" each day on a news site. As you know, language interests me, and one of the Steven Pinker books deals with the issue of fiddle-faddle vs. faddle-fiddle, with an essay on the muscles of the mouth and tongue. A great explanation of the brain deciding how to optimise the sequence of muscle movements.
Hence Follows my Fervent Fascination For the First Film, and my Failure to Find the Following Film. :grin:
Cheers
Chris
There's nothing heavier than an empty water bottle

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 15576
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: brings.slot.perky

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Argus wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 07:42
We eat gröt, sometimes, for breakfast. Gröt (SWE) - grautr (old Norse) - grut (old English) - groats -> porridge. :laugh:
Hence, I guess, "grits" in the southern part of the USA?
Cheers
Chris
There's nothing heavier than an empty water bottle

GeoffW
PlatinumLounger
Posts: 4046
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 07:23

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by GeoffW »

ChrisGreaves wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 21:27
Argus wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 07:42
We eat gröt, sometimes, for breakfast. Gröt (SWE) - grautr (old Norse) - grut (old English) - groats -> porridge. :laugh:
Hence, I guess, "grits" in the southern part of the USA?
Cheers
Chris
Perhaps that should be groats grits. Or grits groats.

Have you seen the History of English Podcast? I've been listening to it for a few years now.

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 78370
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by HansV »

I hadn't realized that English Podcast was so old that it already has its own history...
Best wishes,
Hans

GeoffW
PlatinumLounger
Posts: 4046
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 07:23

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by GeoffW »

The History of the History of English Podcast Podcast is its own podcast.

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 15576
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: brings.slot.perky

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by ChrisGreaves »

GeoffW wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 22:12
Have you seen the History of English Podcast? I've been listening to it for a few years now.
Hi Geoff; thanks for adding, at a rough estimate 200 hours, to my podcast backlog.
That means an extra 200 hours of walking around, or cycling around, Bonavista, and FWIW it is still raining ...
:weep: :threadhead:
Chris
There's nothing heavier than an empty water bottle

GeoffW
PlatinumLounger
Posts: 4046
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 07:23

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by GeoffW »

Nah. About 160 hours. And play them at 1.5 times normal speed. So a little over 100 hours will do it.

That's about the number of waking hours between now and when it stops raining.

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 15576
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: brings.slot.perky

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by ChrisGreaves »

GeoffW wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 23:38
Nah. About 160 hours. And play them at 1.5 times normal speed. So a little over 100 hours will do it.
Funny you should mention that. I do have the ABC's AM set at 1.3 (as fast as Podcast Addict will go I stand corrected, 5.0x, which would cut the playing time down to a working week), which will be amusing if ever someone asks to listen to Australian as she is spoke. ("Gee, those Aussies sure are hard to understand").
I had the Guardian's Science Weekly set fast until I had problems understanding the sound-bites from experts.
That's about the number of waking hours between now and when it stops raining.
:clapping: :clapping: :laugh: :rofl:
Cheers
Chris
There's nothing heavier than an empty water bottle

User avatar
Argus
GoldLounger
Posts: 3081
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 19:07

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by Argus »

ChrisGreaves wrote:
27 Jul 2020, 10:11
GeoffW wrote:
26 Jul 2020, 23:38
Nah. About 160 hours. And play them at 1.5 times normal speed. So a little over 100 hours will do it.
Funny you should mention that. I do have the ABC's AM set at 1.3 (as fast as Podcast Addict will go I stand corrected, 5.0x, which would cut the playing time down to a working week) ...
And two ears; plug one into a MP3 player and the other to a phone and you can cut it into half of that time. A bit difficult concentrating on the reading I admit ...
Byelingual    When you speak two languages but start losing vocabulary in both of them.

User avatar
BobH
UraniumLounger
Posts: 9261
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 01:27
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by BobH »

It is said that Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, could write Latin with one hand Greek with the other simultaneously; therefore listening to different parts from each ear should be a snap. :running:
Bob's yer Uncle
(1/2)(1+√5)
Dell Intel Core i5 Laptop, 3570K,1.60 GHz, 8 GB RAM, Windows 11 64-bit, LibreOffice,and other bits and bobs

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 78370
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by HansV »

But there are few people speaking classical Greek and Latin nowadays... :innocent:
Best wishes,
Hans

User avatar
BobH
UraniumLounger
Posts: 9261
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 01:27
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by BobH »

:innocent: ^^^
Given the increase in population since Jefferson's days, it wouldn't surprise me to find that there actually are more speaking those languages now than then. :innocent:
Bob's yer Uncle
(1/2)(1+√5)
Dell Intel Core i5 Laptop, 3570K,1.60 GHz, 8 GB RAM, Windows 11 64-bit, LibreOffice,and other bits and bobs

User avatar
stuck
Panoramic Lounger
Posts: 8158
Joined: 25 Jan 2010, 09:09
Location: retirement

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by stuck »

BobH wrote:
27 Jul 2020, 21:52
....more speaking those languages now than then.
Recently we drove past a building signed 'Oxford Language School'. "Didn't know there was such a thing as the Oxford language", says I, thinking I'm being witty. Faster than a speeding bullet stuckling2 comes back, "The language of Oxford is Latin, I thought everybody knew that."

Ken

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 78370
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by HansV »

Excellent! :grin:
Best wishes,
Hans

User avatar
StuartR
Administrator
Posts: 12601
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 15:49
Location: London, Europe

Re: Why we don't eat "pirrodge" for breakfast

Post by StuartR »

stuck wrote:
28 Jul 2020, 18:04
"The language of Oxford is Latin, I thought everybody knew that."
I remember being at dinner in Magdalen College on Oak Apple Day one year. The language of the high table that day was Old Norman. They passed round a cup of wine and everyone had to recite this phrase in Old Norman, I forget what it meant now.
StuartR