Pudding bags

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ChrisGreaves
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Pudding bags

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Jiggs Dinner, Pease pudding, Blueberry pudding and Hot Butter Sauce
The trouble I go to for you guys (mutters, shakes head, ...)
Bonavista_IMG_20191025_130417948.JPG
The bag is fine mesh. I used to buy flour in, well, flour sacks, and I think that flour sack material would do just as well. This bag comes with a hem that looks as if the string should be threaded through, but the hem is sealed, so you just tie the string around the (outside of) the neck of the bag. I did that with a tea-towel, but the towel charred on the bottom of my boiling pan.
Bonavista_IMG_20191025_130426580.JPG
You can order a pudding bag from Duckworth Street and I have no doubt that they will ship it around the world – a concept that has puzzled me for years. Why would I want a product shipped right around the world? I want it delivered to me where I live!

Cheers
Chris
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HansV
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by HansV »

Pudding bags - isn't that just a fancy name for the skin below your eyes when you're tired? :innocent:
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Rudi
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by Rudi »

I'd prefer a "doggy bag".
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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Rudi wrote:I'd prefer a "doggy bag".
You could fit a dog in the bag, then boil it, but you couldn't do a fully-grown Alsatian.
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jstevens
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by jstevens »

ChrisGreaves wrote: You could fit a dog in the bag, then boil it, but you couldn't do a fully-grown Alsatian.
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Chris
You would end up with a hot dog....
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Argus
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by Argus »

jstevens wrote:
ChrisGreaves wrote: You could fit a dog in the bag, then boil it, but you couldn't do a fully-grown Alsatian.
Cheers
Chris
You would end up with a hot dog....
Now I've got a bad case of catachresis: The proof of the pudding is des Pudels Kern?
(Eew.)

Good luck with the pudding bags. If you do a search for pudding bag, you'll find a (to me) surprising amount of sites mentioning NL and pudding; is that a thing there?
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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Argus wrote:... you'll find a (to me) surprising amount of sites mentioning NL and pudding; is that a thing there?
Yes.
WSAnd no.
I remember my parents making Christmas Puddings in a bag (and hanging it from the ceiling like one of those piñata thingys.
Drove me crazy.
I used to stand and stare at it every day, dreaming of getting a three-penny piece in my serving.

In later years I figured that Grandma was deft at thumbing a for-sure piece in as she passed the bowl to me.

PeasePudding is a favorite here in Bonavista, but many of use grew up with the English nursery rhyme, so the dish must have been well-known back when.

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Chris
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DaveA
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by DaveA »

This "Pudding" that is be discussed here, is it the "English" Cake style or the American style (Custard)?

Why would any one want to cook "Pudding" even a cake in a cloth bag?
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BobH
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by BobH »

I'd like to try making pease pudding, but I don't know what the 'yellow peas' are. Could someone please translate that to 'Murican - preferably S'uthern 'Murican?
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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by ChrisGreaves »

DaveA wrote:This "Pudding" that is be discussed here, is it the "English" Cake style or the American style (Custard)?
Good point. My Lancashire mother used "pudding" to name the course we ate when we had finished our mince on toast.
Mince of course was minced-meat, (minced beef, not minced food-stuffs (but see Bryson's "made in America")) with gravy powder stirred in.
Mince, as distinct from dried and candied fruit, which is what was used to make Christmas Pudding with, I suspect, gasp! horror! a teaspoon or two of real Brandy in it.
This mixture (Christmas-pudding-to-be) was boiled in cloth and then hung to "cure" for a week or two.[/quote]
Why would any one want to cook "Pudding" even a cake in a cloth bag?
I have an alternate theory: that hanging the clothed pudding was a means of keeping it out of my reach.
They did, after all, put a padlock on the kitchen door, but I dragged a chair from the dining-room and managed to pick the lock.

Shortly after that they shipped me off to Australia.

Cheers
Chris
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ChrisGreaves
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Re: Pudding bags

Post by ChrisGreaves »

BobH wrote:I'd like to try making pease pudding, but I don't know what the 'yellow peas' are. Could someone please translate that to 'Murican - preferably S'uthern 'Murican?
Yellow peas
main crops are, I think, in a place called Texas.

My mum's second-greatest legacy to me was to tell me to Play With My Food.
That is, substitute.
If you can't find yellow peas, try (dried) peas that are green. Or split peas. Or lentils. or almost any smallish legume bean.

The prolonged boiling turns the vegetable matter to mush. Excess water is wrung out by hand (yes, wait for the bag to cool!).

Once all our teeth have fallen out, we will rename this forum to be the "pease pudding" forum.
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=pease+pudding+hot

Cheers
Chris
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