Frozen Onions

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Bonavista_IMG_20191020_105228740.JPG
Wayne who sold me five gallons of partridgeberries told me about freezing onions. The partrdigeberries were a good price, and so I decided to give it a try. I diced two (or it might have been four) yellow large onions the way I do for supper, and dropped them in a thin bag, that in another.
Bonavista_IMG_20191020_105246632.JPG
One and a half pounds of diced onions.
Bonavista_IMG_20191020_105355159.JPG
I have snapped off an eight-ounce chunk, probably the equivalent of one onion, and this chunk is now defrosting while the frying pan warms up. Caramelized onions. Yummy! But one must be patient – 40 to 60 minutes on a low heat.
Cheers
Chris
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 68785
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by HansV »

What is the advantage of freeing, then thawing chopped onions?
Regards,
Hans

User avatar
Rudi
gamma jay
Posts: 25096
Joined: 17 Mar 2010, 17:33
Location: Cape Town

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by Rudi »

HansV wrote:What is the advantage of freeing, then thawing chopped onions?
I concur. You could freeze them whole and then smash them with a sledgehammer to avoid the chopping (and the tears).
Regards,
Rudi

If your absence does not affect them, your presence didn't matter.

User avatar
HansV
Administrator
Posts: 68785
Joined: 16 Jan 2010, 00:14
Status: Microsoft MVP
Location: Wageningen, The Netherlands

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by HansV »

Or use a chainsaw...
Regards,
Hans

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

HansV wrote:What is the advantage of freeing, then thawing chopped onions?
(From the Miss World contest) “The advantage of freezing and then thawing onions is that they are easier to eat or cook when thawed”. :groan:
I gather from Wayne Taylor(Tailor? Sandra’s uncle at any rate) that he freezes onions when he has had a good crop and pulled them at about this time of year. I might do the same if Swyers put ten-pound bags on special: buy two sacks and freeze one.
Another advantage to me is that I might dice and freeze five to ten pounds of onions in one go, and then wash my hands just once; a tremendous savings in soap. Also I get to listen to foreign-language podcasts while dicing.
Cheers
Chris.
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Rudi wrote:
HansV wrote:What is the advantage of freeing, then thawing chopped onions?
I concur. You could freeze them whole and then smash them with a sledgehammer to avoid the chopping (and the tears).
I did consider this very briefly, but only long enough to tremble at the thought of frozen onion chards skittering across the kitchen floor, of adhering to, thawing on, and then slug-like sliding down my window panes.
Cheers
Chris
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
DaveA
SilverLounger
Posts: 2459
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 15:26
Location: Olympia, WA

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by DaveA »

Why freeze them, onions are good keepers fresh.
No power required, reduces your power consumption all the more!
I am so far behind, I think I am First :evilgrin:
Genealogy....confusing the dead and annoying the living

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

DaveA wrote:Why freeze them, onions are good keepers fresh. No power required, reduces your power consumption all the more!
Hi Dave.
Yes they keep. I generally have a ten-pound bag sitting out in the shed.

This time around I froze them because Wayne said he did, and I'd never tried it. A "good to know" sort of thing.
My comments to Hans (I think) about getting a week's worth of dicing done for one wash-of-the-hands works for me.
I agree I am consuming power, the onlky upside is that the more power I burn the lower goes my mill rate. NL Power dings us $20 a bill for the milliseconds that our accounting data passes over the read-write heads.
Untitled.png
To find my real mill rate, use the bill total $42.91 against the 192 KwH consumed.
Spoiler
I see 22.34 cents/KwH
Getting away from me, 2-cup plastic bags of frozen onions would be a boon for someone who has trouble controlling a sharp knife, but can manage to hold a spatula in one hand and a frying pan in the other. Arthritic older people come to mind, he typed out painfully (grin)
I could probably dream up other great uses.

Cheers
Chris
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
BobH
UraniumLounger
Posts: 7848
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 01:27
Location: Temple - Deep in the Heart of Texas

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by BobH »

Is a 'harmonized' sales tax easier to accept? What does that qualifier mean?
Regards, BobH
Story of my life: I knew better but did it anyway!
Intel Core i5, 3570K, 3.40 GHz, 16 GB RAM, ECS Z77 H2-A3 Mobo, Windows 7 >HPE 64-bit, MS Office 2016

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

BobH wrote:Is a 'harmonized' sales tax easier to accept? What does that qualifier mean?
Hi Bob.
If you don't see this reply it's because I am being too political (grin).

We used to have a federal sales task "GST" that was applied across the country, and a Provincial sales tax "PST" that ranged from non-existent to 5% to 8% from province to province.
Quite separate from the hospitality tax that is added to the bills of tourists who elect to stay in lodgings within (I think) 50Km or 100Km of St John's.

After a million years, the various governments realised that if they lumped the two taxes together, GST+PST=HST, then they could effectively hide the PST portion.

Truth is, the HST can be applied in places that might have been debatable in the past, but (shrugs shoulders) "It's just the HST, everyone pays it, right?".

Equalization payments are another matter

If you are bored, read the last paragraph in this web page

Cheers
Chris
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Bonavista_IMG_20191101_153209319.JPG
Twelve large onions (so about twelve pounds), peeled, diced, and screwed two two-cup measures per plastic bag. After this they were packed into a carton and slid into the freezer. This is onions for twelve meals of “liver and fried onions” or similar.

Six bags, actually, with the first two cups twisted shut then the second two cups added and twisted shut.
Cheers
Chris
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
Skitterbug
5StarLounger
Posts: 1144
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 12:14
Location: Sitting in my computer chair!

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by Skitterbug »

ChrisGreaves wrote:
Rudi wrote:
HansV wrote:What is the advantage of freeing, then thawing chopped onions?
I concur. You could freeze them whole and then smash them with a sledgehammer to avoid the chopping (and the tears).
I did consider this very briefly, but only long enough to tremble at the thought of frozen onion chards skittering across the kitchen floor, of adhering to, thawing on, and then slug-like sliding down my window panes.
Cheers
Chris
"Skittering" - An interesting way to describe what those frozen onions would do when smashed! :laugh:
We've frozen onions when we needed to 'save' them - because they will start to sprout - since onions do have a shelf life. We chop them in pieces, freeze them on trays and then bag them for use in any recipe that calls for onions! :smile: No need to smash them! :thumbup:
Skitterbug :coffeetime:
A cup of coffee shared with a friend is happiness tasted and time well spent.

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

Skitterbug wrote:We've frozen onions when we needed to 'save' them - because they will start to sprout - since onions do have a shelf life. We chop them in pieces, freeze them on trays and then bag them for use in any recipe that calls for onions!
That is part of my reasoning too, Skitterbug.

I figured that when I but a 10lb sack, I could freeze half of them as a reservoir in case I run out before the end-of-month delivery.
Cheers
Chris
Entropy never sleeps

User avatar
BobH
UraniumLounger
Posts: 7848
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 01:27
Location: Temple - Deep in the Heart of Texas

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by BobH »

Since it IS Winter in Bonavista - the other season, Summer having passed - put the onions in teh shed and they will freeze without consuming power. QED
Regards, BobH
Story of my life: I knew better but did it anyway!
Intel Core i5, 3570K, 3.40 GHz, 16 GB RAM, ECS Z77 H2-A3 Mobo, Windows 7 >HPE 64-bit, MS Office 2016

User avatar
ChrisGreaves
PlutoniumLounger
Posts: 11134
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:23
Location: paused.undefined.exposed

Re: Frozen Onions

Post by ChrisGreaves »

BobH wrote:Since it IS Winter in Bonavista - the other season, Summer having passed - put the onions in teh shed and they will freeze without consuming power. QED
Right on.
I have wrapped two trays of apple in newspaper (well, free supermarket flyers actually) and tomorrow I start coring and making apple slices to thread on a string in the shed.
Sublimation should do the trick and dry them out in no time at all!

Cheers
Chris
Entropy never sleeps